JE SUIS DEISEL: Honey McBee, still with Paris.

Tuesday 24 November: The aftermath of Paris and all its ramifications is still with us. Brussels in lockdown, life suspended, suspects still on the run – and a dead police dog…

THE ANGER CONTINUES: Last week we brought you HBO presenter John Oliver’s outburst; this week it’s nearer home. Thursday late night viewers were treated to This Week’s Andrew Neil in full flow; and here’s the Twitter reaction. [Not everyone thought Neil’s outburst was a good thing. Nick Cohen in the Spectator explained why c’est magnifique, mais ce n’est pas le journalisme…]

HARD TO FOLLOW, but here goes:  Douglas Murray in the Spectator – Nine conclusions not to draw from the Paris attacks – “the worst… of the nonsense going round”.

Tim Marshall in CAPX – ISIS will not win because they are a bunch of losers; Jihad offers them redemption from their sad lives and to make amends in the name of God. They also get to wear cool neck scarves and carry Kalashnikovs. In Bradford and Brussels they couldn’t get a date – in Raqqa there are dates aplenty and child brides thrown in for good measure”.

Brendan O’Neill in Friday’s Spiked – “Apres Paris, C’est De Raviver L’Esprit de Lumieres”.  An opportunity to test your school French, but don’t worry, it’s also in English and repays reading.“That’s enough cultural appeasement; let’s fight for the Enlightenment…Less than 24 hours after the barbarism in Paris, the bodies of more than 120 concertgoers, Friday-night revellers and children barely cold, and the apologism has already begun. They couldn’t even wait a whole day…”

Adam Shatz in the London Review of Books [thanks to Bella Caledonia for the link] borders on being one of O’Neill’s apologists. A lengthy look at growing French military involvement in the Middle East and the reasons for the growth of ISIL – “All the actors in the Syria cauldron – the Gulf states, Turkey, Hizbullah, the Russians, the Americans – have had a hand in creating this monster, but no one seems to want to fight it, apart from the Kurds..”

It’s all Belgium’s fault, says Tim King for Politico. It’s a failed state, says King, and those who live there are not surprised by last week’s events. “What is remarkable about Molenbeek is the proximity of the poverty and lawlessness to the center of a European capital city … the distribution of wealth in Brussels follows a pattern that is more commonly found in American cities — wealthy suburbs surrounding a hollowed-out center of poverty and blight.”

And what does Scotland think? Alan Cochrane in the Telegraph took his usual glee in reporting an apparent rift between the First Minister and the SNP’s Foreign Affairs spokesman, one A. Salmond, Esq., over possible air strikes. David Torrance in yesterday’s Herald also considered the SNP’s position…

THE HOME OF THE BRAVE: Lindy West in the Observer looked  back fondly at George Bush’s presidency – “The reaction of Republican presidential candidates to the horrific terrorist attack in Paris and the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis [proves] there are at least 14 people who would make much, much worse presidents than George W Bush, and, alarmingly, all of them are currently running for president.”

Ali Gharib followed up in Monday’s Guardian –“Amid all the warmongering, bigotry and crusading, only one salient fact emerged from the Republican reactions to the Paris attacks: none of the party’s candidates are fit to govern in moments of international crisis”.

If you still harbour any doubt that US policy in Syria is confused, watch this congressional hearing. Senator Lindsey Graham tells it like it is. You weren’t frightened before? You should be now…

AND IF YOU CAN’T BEAT ‘EM: Belgium remains shut.  Police have asked Belgians not to tweet about anything they see on the streets for fear of alerting terrorists, so what is the response?  Cats.  We just love the mouseketeer.   But posters might be warned – they know where you, and your feline, live, says Thomas Burrows in the Mail Online. Could be the end of the YouTube cat as we know it…

 

MEANWHILE, AT HOME:  The Lords Economic Affairs Committee wants to stop the Scotland Bill in its tracks – it’s coming up for its first Upper House stage – “until fiscal rules are agreed”. In other words, until somebody, somewhere explains exactly how it’s going to work. The committee’s latest report, “A Fracturing Union?” says the transfer of tax powers is being done with undue haste.  Severin Carroll reported in Friday’s Guardian, as did Brian Taylor, BBC Scotland’s Political Editor and Mike Settle in yesterday’s Herald. Other interesting links have been posted by the Twitterati.

 

Kevin McKenna in the Observer pondered an academic study, edited by Prof Tom Devine, of Scotland’s part in slavery that looks at the “collective amnesia” about our involvement and why it has taken so long to come clean.  There are, says McKenna, “a significant number of families in Scotland today whose continuing opulence and influence was built on their family’s administration of pure evil. Not only did Scotland fill its boots on the proceeds of this trade, we have been celebrating it ever since.” 

On his LPW blog, Andrew Tickell disagrees with McKenna’s analysis; slavery is evil, but wiping the past from Glasgow’s streets will not do the trick – “Virginia and Antigua, Buchanan and Ingram, these names are indicting, they’re our history, and they should stay. They ensure, every day, that Glaswegians have no excuse for failing to “face up to our slave trading past.”

 

East Lothian MP George Kerevan in yesterday’s National looked forward [perhaps not quite the mot juste] to Wednesday’s Autumn Statement from the Chancellor. Gideon’s leadership coat is already on a shoogly peg, says George. Throw in a new urgent need for post-Paris defence spending and the fact that all the easy cuts have been made, and he’s in trouble. And if he tries to push Scotland into topping up tax credits while reducing Barnett…

 

AND FINALLY:  OK. This is the last one. We promise.  In case you’ve missed it – and if you blinked, you would have – here, courtesy of CityAM is the Christmas ad running in third place after Mog and the moon man.  Prepare to shed them now…

 

Our Scot-Buzz editors will be toiling on into December, but Honey is off to buzz round the Christmas tree, so here’s wishing you all a Happy and peaceful Christmas and if you’ve got the energy, a riotous Hogmanay. Heaven knows, we could all do with it…

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