I’M A DEMOCRAT BUT…HONEY McBEE’S BUZZ ROUND THE MEDIA

TUESDAY 14 JUNE: our thoughts are obviously very much with the families and friends of the Orlando victims. When is the US going to do something about its gun laws? We should perhaps remember the sentiments expressed here

 

LEAVING IT TO THE EXPERTS…

Back home, it’s but nine days to go. We’ve almost given up listening, but there’s still some interesting esoteric non-mainstream comment around, so here goes…

Our MUST READ this week is Professor Frank Furedi in Spiked, who wondered why so much Remain focus was on the economy. Then light dawned – it’s a displacement activity to avoid discussing national sovereignty, says Furedi, a concept academics and elites prefer not to discuss.  You can’t leave it to the mob. They don’t understand complex issues like that. There is, “a patronising disdain for the apparently easily manipulated masses”. Brush up on your Plato and Socrates, and who knew that arch-villain Machiavelli thought the multitude (that’s us) was more likely to get it right than the experts…

The Sun came over all hot and bothered by last Thursday evening’s tweet by ‘unelected’ Tory peer and Minister Ros Altmann along the lines of MPs know best, how dare you vote against them. Fellow MPs were taken aback. Former Wham guitarist Andrew Ridgely called her a patronising, self-aggrandising snob.” Needless to say, the Baroness back-pedaled a few tweets later…

Laura Perrins is a brave woman. In Thursday’s Conservative Woman, she defended Nigel Farage’s comment that Mass uncontrolled immigration of unaccompanied young men from a foreign culture is dangerous for women and children… not only do we import huge numbers of young men, but also accommodate their derogatory views of women and girls with the poisonous ideology of multiculturalism, so beloved of the Left…thank God for men like Farage, is all I can say. His mother obviously did something right.”

An interesting interview with Anthony Barnett – ironically, one of the ‘experts’- in Thursday’s Common Space posting, who thinks that should Indyref2 actually happen, the EU would be far more welcoming to an independent Scotland after Brexit than it would have been in 2014…

This was the week Labour appeared to wake up to the awful probability that Brexit will win.  Friday’s Herald carried an analysis piece from the left-leaning think Tank IPPR casting doubt on the supposed Scottish support for Remain“unlike the Scottish independence referendum, this vote will be more of a ‘tinman’ referendum. The arguments in Scotland are lacking heart, and while polls may show support for Remain in Scotland, this support is potentially weak and may be difficult to translate into turnout on the day”.

As we settle in front of the box for Eurofootiefest, a salutary warning from Councillor Tom Goddard in ConservativeHome that Brexit will do irreparable harm to British football. It isn’t that EU countries will refuse to play us (though we wouldn’t rule out Dave warning us that this will definitely happen if we leave), but European Court of Justice Ruling C-415/93 – otherwise known as “the Bosman Ruling”. “In practice”, says Cllr Goodman, “the removal of this ruling would impose restrictions on foreign EU players in our leagues and force clubs to pay transfer fees for players who are at the end of their contracts. This would create a revolting stagnation of the English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish leagues…”  [BTL comments worth reading –Ed]

To round it off – and in the interests of a little levity – here’s Jeremy Clarkson in the Sunday Times [£] explaining how Bristol’s year as Europe’s Green Capital [with EU money, natch] has helped make up his mind to vote Remain.  Worth going behind the ST paywall for…

 

IN BRIEF…

‘Not in a good way’: Iain Macwhirter’s post last week is one of the best we’re read on the Named Person controversy that will surely surface again after June 24 – “a potent mix of anxieties about state intrusion and the sanctity of family life… growing resentment from people of all social and political backgrounds at what is seen as an increasingly nannying, bossy and intrusive government that wants to tell people how to raise their children, how to speak, how fast to drive, how much alcohol to drink”.

A rave from the political grave: Scottish Labour clearly needs the kiss of life, and who better to administer it, asked Kevin McKenna in Saturday’s Herald, but former leader Steven Purcell?  – “attitudes to those who have suffered mental health issues remain less compassionate than to those with purely physical ailments … this wretched and reduced Scottish Labour Party, though, needs his imagination and strategic skills more than ever”.

Branding the ‘Butcher’s Apron’? : David Torrance in yesterday’s Herald wondered why we are getting upset at the UK government’s proposal to use the Union Jack on services it provides to Scotland. It’s a marketing thing, he says, after all Scotland uses the Saltire in the same way. But somehow it’s not the same, David. Flags, as you rightly point out, have deeper significance…

Life and Death: Tim Worstall for the Adam Smith Institute looked at life expectancy – in Glasgow in particular. Why is it so low? The answer may surprise you…

Pipes and Drums: The season of Games and piping contests is upon us; Lesley Riddoch in yesterday’s Scotsman strayed from her usual patch, instead looking at the rise of successful pipe bands in Northern Ireland while teaching the pipes seems to be declining in Scottish schools…

At the edge of the world: Donald Murray in the Scottish Review sees the decline of local newspapers  and radio in the Highlands and Islands having ‘major repercussions’ on the nature and quality of democracy. Time was, says Murray, when they called councils and MPs to account, and the nationals were interested in life on the fringe. No more.  As ever, an SR writer hits the nail on the head…

Eat your heart out, Venice:  David Ross in yesterday’s Herald painted a picture of gondolas at the Raploch as he reported that Stirling Council and Stirling City Commission have plans to develop the Forth as an urban waterway with water taxis. Always supposing they can get the money of course. Perhaps they should read Jeremy Clarkson and take a leaf out of Bristol’s book…

Divide and rule: A piece in the New York Observer by Anthony Schindler, ‘How to Defeat the Islamic State’ has to be worth a read, because nobody else seems to have any idea.  ‘Strategic counter-intelligence’ is Schindler’s answer. Interesting background stuff here…

 

…AND FINALLY

It could happen here. Clearly exercising their right to the Freedom of the City, a few hundred sheep take advantage of their shepherd nodding off. Spanish police gambol into action…

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