HONEY McBEE’S BUZZ ROUND THE MEDIA: GOD BLESS AMERICA

 

TODAY’S THE DAY…

Across the pond, as millions more go to the polls to choose their least worst president. What more is there to say?  Alastair McIntosh in yesterday’s Bella Caledonia went back to Trump’s roots on Lewis in search of the second sight attributed to islanders in the hope “that it might shed a little light on just why The Donald has turned out so very wayward, or ‘prodigal’”  McIntosh writes of the psychopathology that has been let loose – you decide whether it’s mere psycho-babble…

We in Scotland now officially don’t care much for Trump – a brief reminder from Deutsche Welle that it was not always thus

Did you know that in seven states voters can write in the candidate of their choice? According to International Business Times, Mickey Mouse and Santa Claus are the favourites running. It’s the land of the free, home of the brave!

Here’s one for the psephologists – Trump supporters are often likened to the great uneducated, unwashed who voted Leave in June, but, posting for Big Think, Laurie Vazquez pointed out that it’s more subtle than liberals v. conservatives; the 2016 divide is not about education. Lots of pool figures and stats to keep you happy…

Writing in yesterday’s CityAM, American commentator Dr John Hulsman says Trump is bad – challenging the Constitution, the civic religion of the United States, the crucial thing that makes it exceptional. For this reason alone, he must be stopped” – but if we think Clinton is Europe’s dream president, says Hulsman, perhaps we should think again…

Jenny Mathers’ posting on Saturday’s Huffington Post delved into Donald Trump’s feminine side. Yes, there is one apparently, and yes, that’s what appeals. Guido Fawkes chimes in with the number of female voters v. number of males. Way to go, Hillary…

And here, finally, is another long word – psychographics – the magic software used by the Trump campaign to identify support amongst swing voters, as reported in yesterday’s Daily Telegraph, that might just secure a win.

 

WE, THE PEOPLE…

Are apparently becoming a populist tyranny in a land where Brexit has awakened neo-fascism and even the Prime Minister is guilty of spreading frightening and widespread hysteria.  Under the heading Mob Rule, Friday’s Scottish Review allowed some Scottish literati – the ‘civilised people’ who ignore tabloid nonsense and lie awake “fretting about it all” – full rein in support of the three wise men of the High Court. The only dissenting voice was our own editor’s contribution. We are usually SR aficionados, but here, for the most part, contempt for ‘ordinary people’ shines like a beacon ablaze on Arthur’s seat.

For the rest …

Brendan O’Neill in Spiked  says it isn’t just a matter of practical nuts and bolts as the ‘filthy rich claimants’ would have us believe; it’s “motivated far less by a love for legally clean procedure than by a naked disdain for ordinary people and our democratic authority … Parliamentary sovereignty isn’t some academic, legalistic idea that judges defend and allow: it is us made political flesh, the institutional expression of the spirit of the people”.  You get the drift. A must read call to arms for any SNP MSPs who voted Leave

And just when you thought there was a welcome period of silence from the First Minister, Lesley Riddoch in yesterday’s Scotsman urges Ms Sturgeon to get stuck in – she is being outdone in the fight to protect British democracy and Scottish interests by an English investment banker. That will not look right to SNP supporters”.  A couple of pages away, Brian Monteith is having none of it – the idea of using Scottish taxpayers’ money to thwart Brexit shows utter contempt, he argues. And Jim Sillars in the Record thinks FM’s tongue is running way ahead of her brain…

Iain Martin in the Observer said the judges were right. UKIP rabble-rousing shows a lack of understanding – wilful or otherwise – of the constitution, says Martin, they, and other Brexiteers should calm down.

Dominic Lawson in his Sunday Times [£] column says “I respect the verdict of the British people” has joined the list of most frequently uttered lies. It was indeed, says Lawson, a move to obstruct and delay – in the belief that the British people may have time to repent of heir insanity, but Parliament voted by a six-to-one margin to pass this decision directly to the voters…

 

ON WEMBLEY’S FIELD THE POPPIES GROW…

The row ahead of Friday’s football match has provoked outrage in some quarters.  Tim Adams in the Observer says Fifa rules should be upheld; the outrage is manufactured and a symbol of our current national concern with interference from outsiders. “Militancy about poppy wearing has been on the march for a long while, of course – it runs in inverse relation to the political mood of the country: the less our national leaders do to make us proud, the more they loudly insist we observe patriotic ritual”.  The traditional minute’s silence, says Adams, is all that is needed.

Duleep Allirajah in Friday’s Spiked  agrees. The poppy is a political symbol, he says, but so is standing for the National Anthem, or football’s anti-racism campaigns. What should be personal, private, grief has become politicised as virtue signalling –“there is a shrill intolerance towards those who don’t wear the poppy … going poppy-less, especially if you’re a public figure, is seen as disrespecting the war dead. Failing to observe these new rituals of public mourning inevitably invites a dressing down from the grief police.”

Mike Small in Thursday’s Bella Caledonia got quite upset, not just by the idea that poppy-wearing has become enforced political posturing, but also [quite rightly – Ed] at the commercialisation creeping in. The SFA will now be fined by Fifa, says Small, and for what?

 

IN BRIEF…

Not such a quick fix:  Glasgow’s ‘fixing room’ proposals have not met with universal approval, explained Georgia Butler of Kingston University in Friday’s Conversation. But it works elsewhere for long-term high risk users, and is surely worth a try?

Stripping out the Willow:  a battle is looming over the teaching of Scottish country dancing in our schools. It’s our national culture v. perceived homophobic bullying, according to Andrew Denholm in Friday’s Herald.

Which cross to bear? It’s an old chestnut, but might be of interest for the historic detail featured in this piece on the future of the Union flag in the latest issue of the Economist.

This land ain’t my land:   Another chestnut, but again, Vicky Allan’s piece in the Sunday Herald is full of details about those who own sizeable chunks of Scotland. The pattern is changing, she says, it’s no longer the aristocracy, but the corporate rich and government quangos we should be looking at…

 

AND FINALLY 

It’s a Scottish icon:  Landseer’s Monarch of the Glen has been everywhere from shortbread tins to tea towels. Now it’s to be sold at Christies next month by owners Diageo. It’s been hanging in the National Museum, but they can’t afford the £10m price tag and neither can the National Galleries. Step forward the Scottish government? There are worse ways to spend taxpayers’ money…

 

 

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