HONEY McBEE’s BUZZ ROUND THE MEDIA: 8 DAYS AND 1 POINT IN IT

EXCITING TIMES ACROSS THE POND…

Especially since the FBI threw its latest little spanner into the works. Rainforests have been expended over this in the past week, so here’s just some of the stuff we found most interesting…

George Monbiot in Wednesday’s Guardian implies that we actually get a frisson from Trump’s excesses – he’s “the distillation of all that we have been induced to desire and admire. Trump is so repulsive not because he offends our civilisation’s most basic values, but because he embodies them”.

On Saturday Jonathan Freedland, also in the Guardian, said Trump is not alone in his apparent misogyny – and the irony that he is pitted against the first female candidate has only added to it. These maps from the Big Think website seem to back him up – if just men, or just women, were voting…

James Silver in the Guardian recounted the modern-day Woodward and Bernstein moment when a reporter at the Washington Post got a call offering the damning Trump Hollywood Access tapes.

Posting on Conservative Woman on Friday Kathy Gyngell had a wee rant at Clinton’s feminist supporters  or ‘harpies’ as she prefers, and in particular Senator Elizabeth Warren. Misses the point by a country mile – Warren was surely responding to Trump’s reference to HRC as a ‘nasty’ woman. But if you’re not a fan of feminists, read on…

…BUT PREPARE TO BE VERY AFRAID

There again, Roya Wolverson, posting on Sunday’s Quartz, said it’s in the bag for Trump. That is, according to an American professor who’s got it right in all eight presidential elections since 1984. Prof. Allan J. Lichtman told the Washington Post way back in September that Trump will win, and despite the sewage flowing under the bridge since, is sticking to his guns.

It would be funny if world safety didn’t depend on it; here’s How Donald Trump sees the World in three maps. Again, thanks to the Big Think.

 

AND SO WE COME TO BREXIT…

Sorry. We’ve spent weeks trying to avoid it, but it keeps rearing its increasingly worrying head. Egged on by Prof. John Curtice, it appears from this report in yesterday’s Scotsman that the First Minister is looking at Scotland becoming the UK’s successor state – sliding our feet under the table at Brussels once Theresa May folds her napkin and calls for her carriage. Or of course plan B, applying as an independent member. Whatever. Depends.

Holyrood’s Economy Committee is going to be busy when it meets later – first, again according to the Scotsman,  it has before it a report from 4-consulting about the contribution of EU workers in Scotland, followed by one from Jeremy Peat and Owen Kelly for Strathclyde University about the effect of Brexit on Scotland’s financial sector; not as bad as independence apparently, conclude Michael Glackin in the Sunday Times [£] and Jack Doyle and Rachel Watson in the Daily Mail.

… OR NOT

No story is complete without a comment from a luvvy, so in the Herald we read that No voter Ewan McGregor is now totally confused.  Don’t worry Ewan, according to the same edition of the Herald Yes voter Prof. Tom Devine, is sure it’ll never happen. Once the ignoramuses discover the ‘forest of complexities’ and ‘catastrophic consequences’ of Brexit, the eminent academic thinks they’ll all be begging to embrace Brussels again  – and of course Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will be able to block it anyway. Dream on, Sir Tom.

But of course, he’s not alone. Former PM Blair came amongst us again last week, seeking to rally Remainers for a second vote.  Iain Martin in Friday’s Reaction says Blair is not the man to block Brexit – rather he caused it in the first place; quadrupling immigration, lack of bank regulation, Iraq  –  -all during his time in office.  Martin’s sentiments are echoed by Cerberus in Saturday’s Conservative Womanyou should never say never in politics. But Britain joining the euro and going back to the EU? And Tony Blair being welcomed back into the Labour fold? You would want long odds to bet on all that.

 

THE REST IN BRIEF…

 

The First Minister backed Heathrow’s third runway.  Rife hypocrisy on just about every count said Iain Macwhirter in the Herald: what was the quid pro quo for delivering the SNP Commons votes?  Dean Kirby in Wednesday’s online Independent says it will benefit Glasgow and Edinburgh airports. Aye, that’ll be right.

 

The worm begins to turn.  In this weekend’s Observer indy supporter Kevin McKenna  warned the SNP high command that playing with the corporates may be rewarding but the momentum for a second referendum won’t last forever…

 

Audit Scotland criticised NHS Scotland’s financial management earlier this month. Libby Brooks in Thursday’s Guardian says it faces massive cuts to services.  Euan McColm in Scotland on Sunday maintained the buck must stop at Nicola Sturgeon.  According to Paul Hutcheon in the Sunday Herald, this hasn’t stopped the bonus gravy train at NHS Tayside in its tracks…

 

Oh, surely not? Bias at the BBC? In Friday’s Common Space, Simon Malzer explained why his group Inform Scotland is erecting billboards alleging BBC ‘mis-reporting’.  Dani Garavelli in SoS was unimpressed –money raised for grievance politics could be better spent elsewhere. Counterproductive, agreed David Torrance in yesterday’s Herald; vilifying the media will not convert No voters to the cause…

 

Last night was Halloween.  Well, no, not in one corner of Scotland it wasn’t. Douglas Barrie on the STV website explained that in Kilmarnock guisers are out and about each year on the last Friday in October. Why? Well, that was traditionally payday, and payday means better treats. No flies on the sons and daughters of Killie…

 

Many wept openly, but Vicky Allan in the Sunday Herald is glad to see the back of GBBO. Too middle-class, too elitist, too removed from ordinary lives. For sheer po-facery, Ms Allan takes the show-stopper biscuit.  And while we’re goggle-boxing, Laura Perrins in Conservative Woman revisited the Poldark experience.  It’s fiction and it’s fantasy, says Perrins. Get over it.

 

AND FINALLY

If you weren’t paranoid before you read this, you will be after.   A posting on Friday’s Reaction from Ansgar Koene and Derek McAuley explains how hackers might use everyday objects – Things – to bring down mighty corporations. It isn’t just computers and phones, they’ve moved on to webcams and baby monitors. Anything wi-fi is fair game apparently.  And before you reach for a restoring cup of tea, have you looked closely at that kettle recently…

 

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