HONEY McBEE’S BUZZ ROUND THE MEDIA: THE DUST IS SETTLING…

Foremost in the firing line are white people; those who voted for Trump, that is.

Our first MUST READ this week is from Brendan O’Neill in Friday’s Spiked. O’Neill says enough is enough; the ‘white talk’, he alleges, is not an attempt to understand the voters, it’s racially charged, dehumanising expression of class contempt by well-connected white people, and some non-whites, for the wrong kind of white people: bad whites; unthinking whites; the dim or undeserving poor; or what used to be known, in times when vile elitism at least had the decency to be honest, as ‘the underclass’”.

Sound familiar? These are “the same people who stalk the nightmares of Remainer politicians… the other whites…the gruff speakers and unhealthy eaters of the north of England… the insensitive, the ungrateful, the unlearned…”

Our second MUST READ – Janet Daley in the Sunday Telegraph. Echoing O’Neill, Daley warns that class warfare will return to Britain“where the disdain for ordinary people and their opinions runs very deep in what is still a class-based culture” – as the liberal backlash begins.

There are, of course, very deeply unpleasant aspects to some of Trump’s support [though with friends like these…] as Thom Cross in Friday’s Bella Caledonia was at pains to point out.

It couldn’t happen here. In a Wha’s like us moment, Iain Macwhirter in the Sunday Herald says Scotland’s working class is too enlightened, politically engaged and well led to succumb to prejudice. Presumably he had not seen this little poll

 

Next up is Steve Bannon, Trump’s campaign manager is now front and centre as he becomes chief strategist to the President.  Iain Martin in Wednesday’s Reaction advises Bannon’s critics to be accurate, rather than sloganeering about fascists and white supremacy. To that end, he recommends Buzzfeed’s transcript of a 2014 speech Bannon gave at a Vatican conference.

Laura Perrins also posts parts of the speech on The Conservative Woman website – “the liberal media, smarting over the whipping by Trump, are not going down without a fight”, but remember, she says, “the higher you are the greater the fall, and for the liberal media this has been a very steep fall from the moral high ground they have occupied for so long…”

Concern over ‘fake’ news appearing on social media surfaced this week. Paul Ratner’s Big Think posting on Tuesday says it’s nothing compared with the ‘sensational character-driven and issue-free reporting in the mainstream media: America has been taken over by the ‘yellow journalism’ of which Bannon stands accused. What is it? Ratner looks at its history, beginning with Pulitzer and Randolph Hearst. An interesting read…

 

The Go-Between:  Is it in the realms of fantasy? When  UKIP and Farage go their separate ways, Adam Boulton in the Sunday Times[£] thinks Theresa May might yet have to call on Nigel Farage’s natural conservative tendencies to get her through difficult Brexit negotiations and corral Trump’s support. Not covered in ermine however – “Farage can spot a trap… instead he can continue to string along the Tories, fully aware that he is kind of a cult hero in this global populist movement”. Here’s what the New York Observer thinks…

 

Post-Truth is the new order of the day. The OED made it the word of the year. For those of us still floundering, Andrew Calcutt of the University of East London kindly explained the what, why and how in Friday’s Conversation. Would-be UKIP leader Paul Nuttall had his own, somewhat feistier, version in the Telegraph.

 

JAMs also entered the political lexicon this week, as Theresa May’s Just About Managing’ families are expected to figure in the Chancellor’s autumn statement. Thursday’s Sun explained who the JAMs are and why we can expect to hear more about them.

While we’re on the subject, Brian Monteith in yesterday’s Scotsman thinks Hammond’s statement could define Theresa May’s government for years to come – it’s that important. The best thing, says Monteith, is that Hammond is not George Osborne.

 

Dead, but they won’t lie down:  welcome the new come-back again and again kids. Yes, it’s Tony Blair, ‘Spud’ Murphy and, allegedly, George Osborne joining forces to challenge Brexit. Reports in the Sunday Times [£], yesterday’s Herald and the National all suggest a think tank is in the air. Not exactly manning the barricades then…

 

AT HOME…

Off the rails? Labour fell on ScotRail’s little local difficulty on Thursday like a dog with a bone, so that by the weekend Euan McColm in Scotland on Sunday was claiming that discontent with rail services  may yet be the undoing of the SNP, and its Transport Minister Humza Yousaf. Though Humza, according to yesterday’s National, still has a wee trick up his sleeve .

Razzle-dazzle:  Saturday’s Bella Caledonia carried an interesting post by Jen Stout about  ‘dazzle ships’  – painted in “complicated and outlandishly bold” designs in WW1 to confuse the enemy’s sense of size, distance and direction. Hurry to Leith Docks to see former lighthouse supply ship MV Fingal temporarily transformed into a dazzle ship to commemorate the centenary of the war.

Form an orderly queue:  Yesterday’s P&J covered the opening of The Rothesay Rooms in Ballater – Prince Charles’s contribution to the town’s Flood Appeal after last winter’s disaster. Bookings now being taken for a royal seasonal menu…

 

AND AWAY…

It really is the nasty party:  The Daily Mail reports that while his colleagues have rescue cats Larry and Palmerston, the new Tory Chief Whip keeps a tarantula on his desk. Woe betide any hapless backbencher failing to toe the line…

Every little helps:  It’s something Greens have been arguing for a long time – and it makes sense – building over shops and car parks to make use of redundant urban space. So we should perhaps welcome news from yesterday’s CityAM that Tesco is in talks to build housing units over its London stores.

 

AND FINALLY…

You’ll have noticed, here at ScotBuzz we love quirky maps.  Did you know that half the world’s people live in just 1% of it? Or that half of North Africa lives along the Nile? Check out these and more from the World Economic Forum website.

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