AN EVEL WEEK: Honey McBee’s pick of the crop

Tuesday 27 October: It’s been an EVEL week

…Not just because we wuz robbed at Twickenham. Aye, we were. And it still hurts.

But we are also, says SNP MP Pete Wishart, victims of constitutional larceny. His Musings and mutterings from Perthshire blog revealed him to be far from a happy bunny. Alex Massie in the Spectator decided Wishart’s party was being both hypocritical and tedious.There is something irksome about all this gurning; a reminder that grievance is the nationalists’ reserve currency. Ignore them and they will howl; give them what they want and they will find a reason to complain too”.  Brian Monteith in yesterday’s Scotsman tends to agree.

Kevin McKenna in the Observer was much exercised about life in general under the Tories – steelmaking, poverty, global markets – as well as this latest sleight of hand – “the cherry on top for the Tory hard right”. Iain Macwhirter railed in the Independent that we would never again have a Labour Prime Minister –EVEL is “the most narrow-minded exercise in partisan constitutionalism in British history”.

Legal eagle Andrew Tickell – aka Lallands Peat Worrier – urged us all to calm down. It’s not as bad as it’s made out. And as a postscript, adds that it won’t last forever either…

 

Thick as red bricks? Here’s a nice wee example of British snobbery, worth a look for the cartoon alone.  Harry Mount in the Spectator looks at the alma maters [yes, we know, almae matres for pedants] of Corbynite Labour ministers and former cabinets, both Labour and Tory. Mount’s point is that it was once Labour who produced the towering intellects – Wilson and Healey for two – while traditional Tories were ‘suspicious of planet-sized brains’. Reverse ferret…

In similar vein, D. Telegraph #Corbyn petard-hoisting courtesy of the Huffington Post. It never pays…

 

Big bang, big bucks: According to Andrew Whitaker and Tom Peterkin in SoS, it looks very much as though Scottish Labour is on course at this week’s conference to join the SNP in wanting to see the back of Trident. Anyway, the whole thing may become academic if yesterday’s Herald and this Reuters report are to be believed. Deficit? What deficit?

Meanwhile, Ewen MacAskill in the Guardian reported the misgivings of Faslane staff on proposals to extend the time docking submarines are without electricity from twenty minutes to three hours. Will the nuclear reactors heat up if their cooling pumps are not working? It’s cost-cutting, of course but operator Babcock says not to worry. Hmm…

 

Trolling tales: First Alex Massie in CapX on the diatribe meted out to JK Rowling for her support of Scotland in the wake of last Sunday’s debacle. Then Kenneth Roy in the Scottish Review [more musings and mutterings, this time from Prestwick rather than Perthshire], pondered his own treatment at the hand of Cat Boyd of the National. As ever with a wit and wisdom rarely displayed by his detractor…

 

Back to fitba: Two QI round ball stories after weeks of the oval variety. First up Martyn McLaughlin in yesterday’s Scotsman on the Ayrshire village of Glenbuck – now the centre of regeneration plans, but more importantly, birthplace of the immortal Bill ‘more important than life or death’ Shankly. Second, a trip down memory lane for Aidan Smith in Scotland on Sunday as he recalled the joy of a bit of peace and quiet on Christmas Day to read his football annual. Ah, the days of yesteryear. Long gone, but not quite forgotten…

 

Tweet of the week: Tory leader Ruth Davidson last Sunday. And while we’re here, La Davidson’s thoughts on George Osborne, Jamie Oliver and HIGNFY – all in the Mail on Sunday…

 

Take aim. Fire: When your next over-crowded, often late and usually somewhat grubby encounter with Scot-Rail finally drives you to complain, we know just the man. Forget customer services, the go-to person is Mr Roy Brannen, newly appointed CEO of Transport Scotland. How do we know? Because when we had a similar whinge to Transport Minister Derek Mackay the buck flew neatly to the desk of a poor staffer at TS, to whom it fell to issue mindless platitudes about future utopias on the track. In future, straight to the top…

 

And finally…this day is called: The 600th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt. Well, Sunday actually, but you get the drift from this piece in The Conversation from Alison Findlay of Lancaster University. Henry V [who, let’s not forget, was Welsh, as were most of his archers] was Shakespeare’s English hero, but the reality, says Findlay, was a little different. For us, Henry will forever be Kenneth Branagh…

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